5 Interior Design Trends for 2018

As another somewhat turbulent year draws to a close, we look forward to the next one – all shiny, new and full of promise – it can’t help but warm the cockles! As always, external factors and a general mood and zeitgeist form part of these new directions before being distilled into discernible trends, and here at Oak Furniture Land we’re waiting with bated breath for those new Spring/Summer collections to drop in the coming few months so we can give our homes – and our spirits – a little refresh. Here are some of the trends we’re most looking forward to getting better acquainted with:

Scandi with soul

scandi with soul interior design

Credit: Coco Lapine

Our love affair with our Nordic cousins is going nowhere, but to better suit a more British aesthetic, we are seeing a move away from those stark white and strictly monochrome interiors towards spaces with more depth and texture, incorporating warm woods and mismatched, layered materials. Colour palettes are still muted, but cover a broader spectrum of neutrals and at least 50 shades of grey (snigger). This slightly more relaxed approach is easier to live with, whilst still providing a blank enough canvas to incorporate existing household pieces.

Global influence

interior design influenced by the globe

Credit: The Boho Bungalow

With world events so prevalent in the news this past year and as technology breaks down even more boundaries, it is unsurprising that we find our homes incorporating increasingly cherry-picked elements from a number of different cultures and distilling them into one big melting pot. The beauty of the Global trend is exactly this broad-brushstrokes treatment: African rugs combine with Peruvian motifs and bright Mexican hues to create an eclectic, individual look with a well-worn, homely feel. Colours are earthy, textures prevail and the rules are open enough to really make this trend your own.

Pink as a neutral

pink walls acting as neutral in interior design

Credit: Terkultura

Move over, magnolia: the past few years have seen pink quietly creep its way out of little girl’s bedrooms and into more unexpected areas of the home, such as kitchens and bathrooms. Millennial Pink – a muted hue sitting somewhere between beige and blush –  became a news story in the latter half of 2017, firmly pushing pink into the mainstream. Its warmth and lightness actually makes it a very easy colour to work with, and it sits well with many tones of wood, making it a surprisingly versatile backdrop. Tastemakers are pairing it with luxe materials and rich berry tones for next season, moving it firmly out of bubblegum – Barbie territory and creating something altogether more sophisticated.

The mindful interior

eco decor in interior design

Credit: The Mindful Interior

So apparently ‘Ikigai’ – a Japanese concept roughly translated as ‘a reason to get up in the morning’ is the new Lagom (the Swedish term for ‘just the right amount’), and Lagom is of course the new Hygge (the Danish way to describe a feeling of cosiness) – confused yet? Our take on all this is simply that we are seeing an increasing movement towards filling our homes with considered, quality furniture and accessories, made with love and integrity; buying less, but buying better. As more and more of us take up meditation and mindfulness, so increases our desire for our homes to reflect this new inner zen. Think natural woods, muted tones and a pared-back colour scheme.

Rich jewel tones

rich jewel-toned interior design

Credit: Dezeen

Unusual for the Spring/Summer seasons, designers are pushing forward with their use of sumptuous materials and vibrant jewel tones for the coming season, pairing them with golds and coppers (just a pinch, mind) and Memphis-esque punchy colour blocks. Velvet is a key material for this trend and fits in perfectly with this concept of warmth (we all know how unpredictable our weather can be, even in supposedly warmer months). Foliage and botanicals remain very much on trend, but think restraint: rather than surfaces brimming with all manner of shoots and strands, opt for less-but-larger plants and stick to those with graphic, structural leaves.

Follow Joanna on Instagram and Twitter for her top tips and inspiration!

You may also like

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *